2
So – what you are saying is this; if we slept like bats, upside down, we would look like we aged 1/3 less and at 66, let’s say, we would look 44?

1
No, that’s not what I said. Let me give you a different example. You throw a stone in a pond and water splashes up, mainly because it is the perfect newtonian fluid and has super low viscosity. For a moment it seemingly defies gravity, then ripples or waves form and spread out in all directions until they dissipate. Do you know why?

2
Um, they get tired?

1
No, the ever-present, gentle pull of gravity works to create a condition of equilibrium. First the splash stops and then those waves get less and less tall until, pffft, gone. Gravity never repels, it always pulls every single thing in a downward direction.

2
pffft? I never heard no wave go pffft! So if we slept upside down we would restore body equilibrium and youthful appearance, I am sure. We would stay taller too, as we aged, I bet.

And if we threw in a whole bunch of cornstarch in a pond, like making gravy, it would act different!

1
Yes, gravy is non-newtonian, just like mud. You know what happens if you let gravy sit in the bowl, right? You can set the ladle on it and it doesn’t sink.

2
Gosh, I thought it was because it formed a layer, like pond scum. So you are saying if I stir it up (apply force) I can ladle or pour it but if I don’t, it’s a lumpy mass? So what about whipped cream? The more we stir that the thicker it gets. And mud, mud is funny. It moves sideways just as readily as any direction. Like you step in it and it mostly moves to the side, not up where there is lots of room.
1
Right. Non-newtonian does not specify the result of applied force, it just says the substance is more viscous (creates more internal friction as it moves, defying separation) so doesn’t act like water. Now let’s get back to gravity, OK?

2
Wait, wait! What you are hinting at is that by adding stuff to water we can change its viscosity and it no longer acts like water?

1
Yes, that is correct. We have created something that is no longer water but is water-based with different properties.

2
You are making my head hurt! But go ahead and lay the explanatory thing (we were discussing before this post) on me one more time.

1
OK, airplanes can fly because of the speed of air is faster across the top of their wings than the bottom. It has to travel further to meet up with its air buddies at the back of the wing. This creates lower pressure across the top and increased pressure across the bottom, and that overall pressure difference is greater than downward gravitational pull (weight) at a certain minimum speed. Birds can fly (but flies can’t bird, according to Winnie) because they flap their wings to create the same uplift condition when moving forward. That’s because birds don’t have jet engines like planes do. And, only hummingbirds and a few birds of prey can hover in calm air. Basically, birds swim in air and in totally calm air, a gliding bird will be pulled downward by gravity and slowed by friction, inexorably, even an Albatross.

Remember from yesterday that air is a non-newtonian fluid and force (or shear) changes how it acts.

2
Wow, our world is so, so totally, weirdly awesome! I’m going to meditate on Bernoulli’s law* (yawning, half concealed by hand), on the couch with my pillow and blanket, with my eyes closed. I’m sure this will all make sense after, uh, after meditating. Oh, BTW, I have a picture for you.

* Bernoulli’s law: fast-moving air is at lower pressure than slow-moving air. This agrees with Newton’s third law which states for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction and the conservation of momentum which states that if one loses momentum, another gains the same amount (when in a collision, for example – added later)

Now I’m dizzy from keeping all this straight.
šŸ˜€

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