2
So, let’s talk about words…

1
(sotto voce – OMG, here we go…) Um, OK, if you must.

2
I been thinking about this ‘neutral ground’ thing in New Orleans. You know, the median or verge, depending. I mean, my neighbor, who first lived in the CBD (Central Business District) then moved to the Lower Ninth Ward as a kid, told me that ‘neutral ground’ was where the gangs from the white and black sides of Saint Claude could both go without infringing on the other’s teritory. So….they called it ‘neutral ground’.

So, first of all, the Lower Ninth was a white neighborhood, Swedes and Eastern European, according to him. Also, when the neighborhood began to change, there were the inevitable clashes. But everyone needed a way out of the neighborhood and Saint Claude Avenue (neutral ground, again) provides that, even today. Back then a streetcar ran all the way out here.

1
And your point is????????

2
Well, I bet the ‘neutral ground’ is just what it says, the ‘neutral’ or ‘common’ ground for the streetcar. I mean, power is overhead in the cable and the tracks provide a path for the electrical flow, the ‘neutral’ conductor, in common parlance. And, as you well know, ‘neutral’ can also be used as ‘ground’ and was, years back. So, ‘neutral ground’, Capisce?

1
So….you think this is what it’s originally about?

2
Well, it makes more sense than naming after a place the gangs agreed not to fight each other. I mean to say….they adopted the word and changed the meaning, I bet.

(For the actual and original meaning, see comment by Ray, below.)

1
Fascinating, I’m sure. Please, go on.

2
Well, we were trying to remember the Spanish word for cookies (which we knew) and biscuits. Cookies are Galletas, biscuits I’ll look up again because I already forgot, as I didn’t know it to begin with. But then I got thinking about the English biscuit, which is a cookie, really. I mean, if you take an English biscuit and tart it up with sprinkles and frosting and such, it becomes a cookie. (Well, something like that) But for the life of me I can’t remember what they might call a biscuit, like a regular baking powder biscuit.
I’ll give them clotted cream, though. What was the food of the Gods, again? Ambrosia, that’s it. I bet ambrosia is really clotted cream. But now that we are Vegan…ish, no more of that.

Remember Pauline’s cooking, the next door neighbor where we stayed. I told her, eating at her house, I understood what excellent English food was. She is a kitchen Goddess and strictly English in the kitchen (and she loves Elvis to pieces 🙂 ) Her husband, Pete, told me a ‘good restaurant’ was one where you didn’t have to worry about upset tummies later on. Yes, he said stronger words but to that effect………God as my witness……. The place I stayed, they’d get Indian take away, much for the same reason. It was safe and good, almost up there with fish and chips. (Well, to them nothing was ‘up there’ with fish and chips.)  ( I ate lots of great food in homes  but the best non dessert, ready-made food was from a vendor in the Victoria bus station, if that gives you an indication.)

And those tea shops. OMG the English do know about cakes and such. I could die and go to heaven…..but not exactly a healthy, balanced diet.

1
Well, now that we are talking about food, not words…….

2
Well, we won’t talk about food in the Bajamas or Holland because we never really got to eat the ‘real stuff’ in either place. Authentic Spanish food (Analucia anyway) is off the chain. Homemade olives, jamon for you meat eaters, any possible seafood (do not, whatever you do, order a ‘hamburger’ or a ‘squid burger’, for that matter) from those little shops. They just don’t understand the hamburger, last I knew, and a piece of squid or octopus on a bun. Eeewoooo and Gack……Well, um…….but go to the little restaurants that locals go to. Heaven, again.

1
OK, OK, tell us about Panama food, since you have changed topics, as usual.

2
Hahahahahaha, real Panama food is either Venezuelan or Colombian, depending on who you talk to. Remember, Panama was part of Colombia for a long time. Both are mighty good but some different. I ate more Venezuelan that Colombian because where I stayed the first half was run by Mari, a nice lady from ‘Little Venice’.

1
Yes, Venezuela is named after Venice, just as Ecuador is named for the equator, which runs right through it. Lots of history down that way, interesting stuff and still being lived out. Che Guevara even, from Cuba, el Doctor, is not yet old news and musty history. Not that long ago, actually. But enough, all this talk about food….well…..it’s time to cook, if you know what I mean.

🙂

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